Veterinarian who reversed the paws on Milo the puppy will be on campus Sept. 25

Erik Clary
Erik Clary is associate professor of surgery and bioethics at Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences in Stillwater, Oklahoma.

September 18, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — Erik Clary, the veterinarian who reversed the paws on Milo the puppy, will be on campus to present two seminars on Sept. 25. 

The first seminar, “On Ethics and the Question of Animal Usage – Ideas Have Consequences,” will be from noon to 1 p.m. in room A132 of the Animal Science Complex. The second seminar, “Serving Milo – The Puppy Born with Upside Down Paws” will begin at 5 p.m. in room B101 of the Animal Science Complex. 

Clary is associate professor of surgery and bioethics at Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences in Stillwater, Oklahoma. He is a board-certified veterinary surgeon and formally-trained ethicist with a background in animal science and medical research. Clary grew up in California’s Imperial Valley, and received his bachelor’s degree at Cal Poly-Pomona, where he competed on both the livestock and meats judging teams and majored in Animal Science. After receiving his bachelor’s degree, Clary pursued veterinary education and specialized training in surgery with stops at Kansas State University for a DVM degree, the University of Georgia for an internship, and North Carolina State University for his residency. While at KSU, he also developed skills in applied research through a concurrent master’s program in ruminant nutrition. 

For ten years, Clary served in Duke University’s Department of Surgery as an experimental surgeon and faculty researcher focusing on the developing field of minimally-invasive surgery. Concurrent with that effort, he built and operated a veterinary surgical practice in Durham, North Carolina. Clary’s clinical activity continues today in his work at Oklahoma State University’s Boren Veterinary Medical Hospital and recently gained international attention with his successful treatment of a puppy born with front paws upside-down. 

On the ethics front, Clary holds multiple graduate degrees that include a Ph.D. obtained in 2015 following successful defense of a dissertation addressing the ethics of withdrawing medical nutrition and hydration from human patients diagnosed as being in a persistent vegetative state. Focusing on bioethics, he covers multiple fronts of this still-developing field. In lectures, publications and policy consultations, he frequently addresses end-of-life medical ethics, but other issues have garnered his attention, including the long-standing debate over animal rights/welfare.


Contact
Jennifer Dush
Department of Animal Science
402-472-3493
jdush2@unl.edu